Modern water house by Michael Meredith


This amazing water house is on the the rugged coast of Georgian Bay on the north-eastern side of Lake Huron which offers rough, yet gorgeous landscape.

It not where you can expect an architectural wonder to be found, but here is a floating water house designed by Michael Meredith of Toronto-based MOS. The water house sits on the water among the characteristic, rocky Canadian Shield terrain, where Becca and Doug Worple, a Cincinnati couple, acquired a U-shaped, three-acre chunk of rock with two aging cottages and a two-story boathouse. In fact this rocky island is a 20-minute boat ride from the mainland, a climate where temperatures range from below zero to 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and a site that endures powerful westerly winds in the wintertime.  Why then this house is built so far far away ?

Water house far far away


Sounds scary, isn’t it? But Michael Meredith of MOS, a young interdisciplinary practice then based in Toronto, had a solution – a main water house cottage with an integrated boathouse and dock, and a series of separate cottages to accommodate the many overnight guests in the summers. For the first building, a two-bedroom sleeping cottage, they chose materials and shapes that wouldn’t stand out, with simple, almost platonic forms. The modest cabin has a boat, a gabled roof and a cladding of untreated cedar.

The water house interior design


Interiors of the water house are wrapped with warm-hued Douglas fir, and a fireplace is made out of local stone. A wood roof structure on two levels keeps the sun’s heat away from the interior, and small windows at either end facilitate natural air-conditioning. The timber cottage blends with its surroundings, which appear untouched, while its sliding barn doors seal the place up as an impenetrable box. The finished building is 1,250 square feet of indoor space featuring a boat slip, storage, and sauna; two bedrooms upstairs, an office, and a galley area, with dramatic views from parallel windows. The ability for the water house to float thus blending in with the environment is a response to the climatic reality as the water is always fluctuating and changing.


Bathroom design


Bathroom interior design


The Water house dining room


Kitchen design


Living room furnishing


Wooden stairs design






Published by Minimalist in